Diva Pondering: Elevensies….

What are Elevensies? Recipes included…

I have long been a fan of afternoon tea in quaint tea shops around the world. In these times I must submit to being creative at home. I an now also a fan of elevensies. Or in Hobbit terminology “Second Breakfast”….

Here are some why and wherefores of this tradition. I hope you enjoy.

Written by Abigail Young

Marie from The English Kitchen blog was kind enough to write a guest post for us, explaining the peculiar British custom of elevenses. Brew a cup of tea, grab a scone, and read on!

Marie from The English Kitchen blog was kind enough to write a guest post for us, explaining the peculiar British custom of elevenses. Brew a cup of tea, grab a scone, and read on!

e·lev·ens·es

noun (British)

1. (Usually used with a plural verb) a mid-morning break for refreshments.

2. The refreshments taken.

3. a light snack, usually with tea or coffee, taken mid-morning

Over here in the UK, a most popular meal break of the day, which is taken by some, (but not by everyone) is a little teatime tradition known as Elevenses, that most delicious break of the morning where people from all walks of life tuck into a little snack and a wet cuppa a la “Afternoon Tea” –  like. 

Generally speaking,  it is not as high falutin’ as Afternoon Tea . . . you won’t be required to put on your best frock or your bow tie . . .  you needn’t make sure your hair is combed neat and tidy . . . you needn’t even break out the best china and silver!  (Save that fuss for Afternoon Tea!)  Elevenses consists merely of a delicious snack or two and a warm bevvie, or cold . . . as you like!

It’s also known as a second breakfast in some circles, coming in between the proper breakfast and before lunch!

Marie from The English Kitchen blog was kind enough to write a guest post for us, explaining the peculiar British custom of elevenses. Brew a cup of tea, grab a scone, and read on!

e·lev·ens·es

noun (British)

1. (Usually used with a plural verb) a midmorning break for refreshments.

2.The refreshments taken.

3. a light snack, usually with tea or coffee, taken mid-morning

Over here in the UK, a most popular meal break of the day, which is taken by some, (but not by everyone) is a little teatime tradition known as Elevenses, that most delicious break of the morning where people from all walks of life tuck into a little snack and a wet cuppa a la “Afternoon Tea” –  like. 

Generally speaking,  it is not as high falutin’ as Afternoon Tea . . . you won’t be required to put on your best frock or your bow tie . . .  you needn’t make sure your hair is combed neat and tidy . . . you needn’t even break out the best china and silver!  (Save that fuss for Afternoon Tea!)  Elevenses consists merely of a delicious snack or two and a warm bevvie, or cold . . . as you like!

It’s also known as a second breakfast in some circles, coming in between the proper breakfast and before lunch!

Custard Buttons

https://www.theenglishkitchen.co/2010/05/custard-buttons.html

Makes about 20 double biscuits
Deliciously short and buttery with a luscious cream centre, tasting of custard. Fabulous!
6 ounces plain flour (1 1/4 cups)
3 TBS custard powder (you want the stuff that comes in the cardboard
container, not the sachets you add hot water to, you want proper custard powder)
1 tsp baking powder
2 1/2 ounces unsalted butter (4 1/2 TBS), cut into bits
2 1/2 ounces white vegetable fat, such as Trex or White flora (4 1/2 TBS Crisco), cut into bits
3 TBS icing sugar, sifted
1 large free range egg
For the filling:
2 ounces unsalted butter (4 TBS)
1 TBS custard powder
4 ounces icing sugar, sifted (1 cup)
few drops of hot water if necessary
Directions:
Pre-heat the oven to 180*C/350*F/ gas mark 5. Line two baking sheets with baking parchment and set aside.
Whisk the flour, custard powder, baking powder and sugar together in a bowl. Drop in the butter and vegetable fat. Rib into the flour mixtue until you have something the consistency of sand. Beat the egg lightly and then stir into the dry mixture, mixing it in well.
Scoop out TBS size pieces of the dough and shape lightly into balls between the palms of your hands. Place about 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. Press down with a fork which you have dusted in flour each time. Bake for 12 to 14 minutes, until well risen and set, but not coloured.
Transfer to a wire rack to cool while you make the filling.
Filling:
Cream the butter, custard powder and sugar together in a large bowl until light and fluffy. Be patient. It will come together eventually and be lovely. If the mixture still seems a bit stiff, add a few drops of hot water and beat until you have the consistency you are after. Sandwich two biscuits together with this custardy filling and then sit back and enjoy!

Bread Pudding:

Ingredient

3 eggs, beaten

1 cup white sugar

2 ½ cups whole milk

1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

4 fresh peaches – peeled, pitted, and sliced

4 apples – peeled, cored and sliced

6 cups day-old artisan bread cubes or cinnamon swirl bread

6 tablespoons butter, cut into pieces

To make whiskey sauce:

1 cup whiskey

1 pound butter

2 cups white sugar

Directions

Step 1 Coat a 9×13 baking dish with cooking spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Step 2 In a large bowl, combine eggs, 1 cup sugar, milk, cinnamon and nutmeg and stir until smooth. Fold in peaches, apples and bread cubes, until bread is well coated. Pour into prepared baking dish. Dot with 6 tablespoons butter.

Step 3 Bake in preheated oven for 1 hour, until set. Serve warm with whiskey sauce.

Step 4 To make whiskey sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine whiskey, 1 pound butter and 2 cups sugar. Cook and stir until sugar dissolves and sauce is smooth. Remove from heat and serve hot.

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