Diva Researching: The Daniel Fast…

Daniel Fast Information:

One of the latest trends in lifestyle changes is the Daniel diet. Based on Bible references. Personally, I find that all new, really good trend diet/lifestyle changes I research get back to the fact that a good Mediterranean diet is a good, healthy essential for almost everyone. However, I know you can research this yourself but I’ve compiled some research for a basic summary and assist if you are interested….

What do you eat on a Daniel Fast?

  • Beans and lentils. All types are permitted.
  • Nuts and seeds. All types are permitted, except those with added salt.
  • Fruits and vegetables. All types are permitted.
  • Oils and fats. …
  • Whole grains. …
  • Unleavened bread. …
  • Herbs and spices. …
  • Beverages.

Eating only fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Avoiding “choice foods” such as meat, dairy and sugars. Drinking only water.

How many times a day do you eat on a Daniel Fast?

It is a personal decision. Some people choose to eat three meals a day, while some add a snack or two in between. Others prefer to skip a meal. There isn’t a specific formula you are required to follow.

Some Snacks

You can pretty much have any of the fresh fruits that you desire so this is a medley of grapes and blueberries and strawberries apple banana oranges. Those with sugar issues should consult your nutritionist.

Can I drink tea on a Daniel Fast?

Black tea, white tea, green tea, oolong tea, and even decaffeinated teas all contain some amount of caffeine. … So it’s best to avoid all forms of caffeine during the fast. Herbal tea may be included in the Daniel Fast, although they should not have any added artificial sweeteners or flavorings.

Foods to avoid on the Daniel Fast:
All leavened bread including Ezekiel Bread (it contains yeast) and baked goods. All refined and processed food products including but not limited to artificial flavorings, food additives, chemicals, white rice, white flour, and foods that contain artificial preservatives.

Can you eat corn tortillas on Daniel Fast?

Whole grains and legumes: All whole grains including brown rice, quinoa, corn, wild rice, bulgur wheat, farro, millet, oats, quinoa, popcorn, and all legumes including beans, lentils, peas, chickpeas. Also includes whole grain pasta and whole grain tortillas.

Effect of a 21 day Daniel Fast on metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women…excerpted https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941756/

Background

Dietary modification via caloric restriction is associated with multiple effects related to improved metabolic and cardiovascular health. However, a mandated reduction in kilocalories is not well-tolerated by many individuals, limiting the long-term application of such a plan. The Daniel Fast is a widely utilized fast based on the Biblical book of Daniel. It involves a 21 day ad libitum food intake period, devoid of animal products and preservatives, and inclusive of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. The purpose of the present study was to determine the efficacy of the Daniel Fast to improve markers of metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk.

Methods

43 subjects (13 men; 30 women; 35 ± 1 yrs; range: 20-62 yrs) completed a 21 day period of modified food intake in accordance with detailed guidelines provided by investigators. All subjects purchased and prepared their own food. Following initial screening, subjects were given one week to prepare for the fast, after which time they reported to the lab for their pre-intervention assessment (day 1). After the 21 day fast, subjects reported to the lab for their post-intervention assessment (day 22). For both visits, subjects reported in a 12 hr fasted state, performing no strenuous physical activity during the preceding 24-48 hrs. At each visit, mental and physical health (SF-12 form), resting heart rate and blood pressure, and anthropometric variables were measured. Blood was collected for determination of complete blood count, metabolic panel, lipid panel, insulin, HOMA-IR, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects’ self-reported compliance, mood, and satiety in relation to the fast were also recorded. Diet records were maintained by all subjects during the 7 day period immediately prior to the fast (usual intake) and during the final 7 days of the fast.

Results

Subjects’ compliance to the fast was 98.7 ± 0.2% (mean ± SEM). Using a 10 point scale, subjects’ mood and satiety were both 7.9 ± 0.2. The following variables were significantly (p < 0.05) lower following the fast as compared to before the fast: white blood cell count (5.68 ± 0.24 vs. 4.99 ± 0.19 103·μL-1), blood urea nitrogen (13.07 ± 0.58 vs. 10.14 ± 0.59 mg·dL-1), blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (14.74 ± 0.59 vs. 11.67 ± 0.68), protein (6.95 ± 0.07 vs. 6.77 ± 0.06 g·dL-1), total cholesterol (171.07 ± 4.57 vs. 138.69 ± 4.39 mg·dL-1), LDL-C (98.38 ± 3.89 vs. 76.07 ± 3.53 mg·dL-1), HDL-C (55.65 ± 2.50 vs. 47.58 ± 2.19 mg·dL-1), SBP (114.65 ± 2.34 vs. 105.93 ± 2.12 mmHg), and DBP (72.23 ± 1.59 vs. 67.00 ± 1.43 mmHg). Insulin (4.42 ± 0.52 vs. 3.37 ± 0.35 μU·mL-1; p = 0.10), HOMA-IR (0.97 ± 0.13 vs.0.72 ± 0.08; p = 0.10), and CRP (3.15 ± 0.91 vs. 1.60 ± 0.42 mg·L-1; p = 0.13), were lowered to a clinically meaningful, albeit statistically insignificant extent. No significant difference was noted for any anthropometric variable (p > 0.05). As expected, multiple differences in dietary intake were noted (p < 0.05), including a reduction in total kilocalorie intake (2185 ± 94 vs. 1722 ± 85).

Conclusion

A 21 day period of modified dietary intake in accordance with the Daniel Fast is 1) well-tolerated by men and women and 2) improves several risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Larger scale, randomized studies, inclusive of a longer time period and possibly a slight modification in food choice in an attempt to maintain HDL cholesterol, are needed to extend these findings.

Bible Thoughts:

Vegetables: all fresh, frozen, dried, juiced, and canned vegetables

– Fruit: all fresh, frozen, dried (with no added sugar), juiced and canned fruit 

– Whole grains: amaranth, barley, brown rice, buckwheat, bulgur, millet. Freekeh, oats, purple rice, wild rice, whole wheat, spelt, forghum, rye, quinoa

– Beans and legumes: black beans, garbanzo beans, kidney beans, lentils, peanuts, pinto beans, split beans, black-eyed peas

– Oils: coconut, olive, sesame, etc., but not for deep-frying

– Nuts and seeds: almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, sunflower seeds, soy nuts, sesame seeds, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts, pistachios, poppy seeds

– Unleavened bread, herbs, spices, and seasonings

– Beverages: water, some fruit juice, unsweetened non-dairy milk

Foods Not Approved for the Daniel Fast

– Alcohol

– Added sugars: any foods with added sugar are prohibited, agave, artificial sweeteners, brown sugar, cane juice, corn syrup, honey, sugar, molasses, etc.

– Meat: beef, bison, chicken, goat, lamb, pork, turkey, fish

– Dairy: butter, cheese, cream, milk, yogurt

– Eggs are prohibited

– Yeast: this includes all leavened bread 

– Refined grains: white rice, white flour

– Processed food: any food with artificial flavorings, coloring, chemicals, additives, and preservatives are prohibited

– Fried food: corn chips, potato chips, French fries, fried vegetables (tempura) etc.

– Solid fats: butter, lard, margarine, shortening

– Chocolate: milk chocolate, semi-sweet, dark, syrup, cacao

– Caffeinated drinks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s